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FILIPINA AMARICAN LIFE IN AMERICA COOKING FILIPINO FOODS 3 DISHES

FILIPINA AMARICAN LIFE IN AMERICA COOKING FILIPINO FOODS 3 DISHES


FILIPINA AMARICAN LIFE IN AMERICA COOKING FILIPINO FOODS 3 DISHES
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The most popular term dinuguan and other regional naming variants come from their respective word for “blood” (e.g. “dugo” in Tagalog means “blood” hence “dinuguan” as “to be stewed with blood”). Possible English translations include pork blood stew or blood pudding stew.[2]

Dinuguan is also called sinugaok in Batangas, zinagan in Ibanag, twik in Itawis, tid-tad in Kapampangan, dinardaraan in Ilocano, dugo-dugo in Cebuano, rugodugo in Waray, sampayna or champayna in Northern Mindanao and tinumis in Bulacan and Nueva Ecija. Another name for dinuguan is “chocolate meat”.

True pinakbet from Ilocos region with shrimp

Pinakbet vegetables; shown are bitter melon, calabaza squash, lady’s finger, eggplants, string beans, and chili

Authentic Bulakan Pinakbet Pinakbet (La Familia of Baliuag)
Pinakbet (also called pakbet or pinak bet) is an indigenous Filipino dish from the northern regions of the Philippines. Pinakbet is made from mixed vegetables steamed in fish or shrimp sauce.[1] The word is the contracted form of the Ilokano word pinakebbet, meaning “shrunk” or “shriveled”.[2] The original Ilocano pinakbet uses bagoong, of fermented monamon or other fish, for seasoning sauce, while further south, bagoong alamang is used. The dish usually includes bitter melon (ampalaya).[3] Other vegetables used include eggplant, tomato, okra, string beans, chili peppers, parda, winged beans, and others. Root crops and some beans like camote, patani, kadios are also optionally added. The young pod of marunggay is also added. It is usually spiced with ginger, onions, or garlic. A Tagalog version usually includes calabaza (kalabasa). Most of these vegetables are easily accessible and are grown in backyards and gardens of most Ilocano households. As its name suggests, it is usually cooked until almost dry and shriveled; in Tagalog version, the flavors of the vegetables are accentuated with shrimp paste. In some cases, lechon, chicharon, or other meats (most commonly pork) are added.

Ginataan, alternatively spelled guinataan, is a Filipino term which refers to food cooked with gatâ (coconut milk). Literally translated, ginataan means “done with coconut milk”. Due to the general nature of the term, it can refer to a number of different dishes, each called ginataan, but distinct from one another.



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